This is the Holly Street Rubie Bag, by Kate Spade.

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I want it so bad I can taste the blue on my tongue.

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For real.

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If you click on the link for the bag, you’ll see the price tag. As much as I love handbags and purchase them both cheaply and at will, the idea of paying that amount for a bag seems illegal somehow. Illegal and wrong. I said as much to my mother.

It doesn’t matter. You’re a young woman. Stop buying cheap and make the investment.

I tend to laugh off similar comments from my mom. She who wants her four children to pool their monies and gift her with a Mercedes Benz because, well, that’s what children do for their mothers who love pretty cars. (Seriously, we would, if our pooled monies would actually amount to something.) She who conversely chided me for spending money to do my hair at a particularly broke time and lectured me about “responsibilities.” (It didn’t make sense to explain how a good hair day makes one’s day livable, sometimes. She disagrees!) The lady is a mosaic of emotions and points of view, no? So when she made the remark about the investment, I just chuckled and reiterated that offering my credit card for a bag with that tag would cause me to lose about a week’s worth of sleep.

But I kept looking at that bag. Here, look at it again. Look.

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My mother feels that earrings, bags, and, well, Mercedes Benzes are always worth the money. (But, weirdly, not hair? Ah, well.) Because those things are part of womanhood, at least the first two, and they shouldn’t be acquired cheaply. I, on the other hand, have never looked at those things beyond the role they play to accessorize me. So if I acquire such things at a cheap price, big deal, right? Mom even tells me that when I was young and she would decorate me with earrings and bracelets and necklaces for special occasions, by the end of the day, those things would be pulled off and discarded, never to be found again. Maybe, even back then, I looked at those things as merely functional and replaceable.

I recognize the value of an investment. Yet I recognize the cardiac arrest that will surely come if I buy that bag. (Outlet prices still won’t be that forgiving.) I also recognize that This Square Peg needs to give up her cheap ways, at least a few of them.

So what shall I do?

Should I buy the bag??

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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